Killer Whale Stalks Swimming Dog and Scares Diver


Still Shot from YouTube video

An Orca (killer whale) was captured on video [below] stalking a dog swimming off a beach, while a skin diver was forced to go to shoals in order to escape being eaten.

The media report stated that the Orca was not dangerous to the dog or the diver, but just curious.
Seattle PI reported:

Most likely neither the diver nor the dog were in danger from these killer whales because orcas are unknown to have ever intentionally harmed a human in the wild, nor attacked dogs either as far as I am aware – and these were most likely the fish eating type that specializes in hunting rays in the shallows around this part of New Zealand. …
Orca biologist Dr. Ingrid Visser knows the area orcas well, and has been diving with the orcas for years. She is dedicated to preserving the wild orca population, and is quick to contrast the contentment experienced by wild orcas with the thoughtless harm of captivity. (See Voice of the Orcas for more information by Dr. Visser).
Orca biologist Dr. Ingrid Visser knows the area orcas well, and has been diving with the orcas for years. She is dedicated to preserving the wild orca population, and is quick to contrast the contentment experienced by wild orcas with the thoughtless harm of captivity. (See Voice of the Orcas for more information by Dr. Visser).

Yet, history pictures a different scenario, in that sometimes they attack (humans) and sometimes they do not …

Killer whales (or orcas) are powerful predators capable of killing prey much larger than humans, such as leopard seals and great white sharks. They have also been recorded preying on usually terrestrial species such as moose swimming between islands.[1]However, wild orcas are not considered a real threat to humans, as there are few documented cases of wild orcas attacking people, and none of the recorded attacks have been fatal. There have been about two dozen cases of orcas attacking humans since the 1970s,[2] almost exclusively perpetrated by captive animals. Experts are divided as to whether the injuries and deaths caused by captive killer whales have been accidents or deliberate attempts to cause harm.[3]There are few recorded cases of wild orcas threatening humans; none of these have been fatal.[4][5]Point Sur, seen from the north on Highway 1§  In the 1910s the Terra Nova Expedition recorded that killer whales had attempted to tip ice floes on which an expedition photographer and a sled dog team were standing.[6] In this case the whales may have mistaken the dogs’ barking for seal calls and grown curious.[6]§  On September 9, 1972,[7] a Californian surfer named Hans Kretschmer reported being bitten by a killer whale at Point Sur; most maintain that this remains the only fairly well-documented instance of a wild orca biting a human.[8][9] His wounds required 100 stitches.[9]§  In August 2005, while swimming in four feet of water in Helm Bay, near Ketchikan, Alaska a 12-year-old boy named Ellis Miller was “bumped” in the shoulder by a 25-foot transient killer whale.[4][8] The boy was not bitten or injured in any way. The bay is frequented by harbor seals, and it is possible that the whale misidentified him as prey.[4]§  During the filming of the third episode of the BBC documentary “Frozen Planet” (2011) a group of orcas were filmed trying to ‘wave wash’ the film crews’ 18-foot zodiac boat as they were filming. The crew had earlier taped the group hunting seals in the same fashion. It was not mentioned if any of the crew were hurt in the encounter.[10] The crew described the orcas as being very tolerant of the film makers’ presence. Over the course of 14 days they filmed over 20 different attacks on seals, many of which the film’s series producer Vanessa Berlowitz describe as training exercises for the young calves in the group. [11][12]

Here is the video taken by a person on the beach of New Zealand at the time of the incident.